Routine Soba Maintenance

It is getting really cold at night and the soba has started to get smoky – these two things seem to happen at the same time.  Maybe it is a combination of the flu being icy cold and having a build up of soot which slows the flow of hot gases and smoke.  Left it would get more smoky, and then dangerous since carbon monoxide would start to become present in the smoke.  It goes without saying that we have carbon monoxide and smoke alarms, in our view anyone who has any device with an open flame in their home should have these.  Even so, it is far better to keep the soba working safely.

So before it got any worse it was time to pull everything apart for cleaning and to remove the soot from the flu.  Cleaning the soba and flu is not a pleSootasant task, but it is essential.  We have a round wire brush on an extendable pole which is just about the ideal tool, but it is a messy job, soot gets everywhere.  Of course it was bound to need doing the day when we have people coming over in the evening…..

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8 responses to “Routine Soba Maintenance

  1. there are granules that you can get at most supermarkets that help to reduce the problem.

  2. This is one job I don’t miss at all. I do miss having a soba though.

    • We are seriously considering upgrading ours next year. We’d like to be able to watch the fire (so much more interesting than TV) and we could live without smoke in the room.

  3. A soba was essential when we lived in Cappadocia but I really hated cleaning it. I could never manage the job without getting soot everywhere. I’m not sure Turks clean theirs as often as they should, which is worrying. I do love a soba, so warm and comforting…but I don’t miss the mess!

    • You are right, cleaning then is not a fun task. Don’t think it is possible to clean them without soot getting everywhere, so now we are trying to dry the filters from the vacuum cleaner.

  4. This is the first time in ages that my comment has actually gone through!!

    • We have never got to the bottom of why this happens. We cannot usually post to Turkey’s for Life, but posting to many others seem to be no problem. It remains one of the mysteries of the blogosphere.

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